The Neshobe Experience

Neshobe Golf Club has been included in the top 100 of the best public golf values in New England and rated the Number 1 value in Vermont by the New England Golf Guide.  Neshobe provides an enjoyable experience for both expert golfers and those with higher handicaps. Our par-72 Championship course lies amongst woods, farm and pasture land, and rolling hills.  While Neshobe GC affords beautiful mountain views in all directions, it is not a typical “mountain course”, having no severe up- or down-hill lies or blind shots.  Clearly, it is a tribute to our Course Superintendent and his staff that players rave about the conditions, featuring 18 distinctive holes which provide a variety of challenges to all facets of the game.

While the course itself is at the core of the golf experience, we also feature a full-service restaurant. Guests may enjoy food and beverages on our covered porch, which affords views of six of the holes.  Our large dining room can accommodate parties, meetings, weddings, and golf outings for large numbers.

We are equally proud of our full service pro shop featuring the latest apparel and equipment. The Pro Shop staff truly “goes the extra mile” to ensure that our guests have a memorable time and receive prompt attention to their needs. Additionally, our PGA Professional, Rodney Bicknell, offers lessons, club repair and construction, as well as maintaining a driving range open to the public.

Family, individual and corporate memberships are available. In addition to usage of the amenities, benefits of membership include monthly tournaments during the season, Ladies’ and Mens’ nights, and Nine and Dine events among others.  Members are permitted to book tee times seven days in advance. Guests are asked to call our front desk at 802-247-3611 or email us at teetimes@neshobe.com, to request a tee time or make arrangements for a group.

The Nesh Has Soul

A golfing buddy of mine described his journey to becoming a member. After playing all of the surrounding courses numerous times, he felt that the overall golf experience at Neshobe was incomparable. In his unique way, he stated the “The Nesh Has Soul, that’s why I’m here.” Our members participate in great numbers in all events, and are quick to respond with time, muscle and equipment for all club needs or projects.

At no time was that more apparent than in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene. Neshobe Golf Club did not escape the devastation and dislocation that affected nearly all of Vermont. Our normally idyllic Neshobe River overflowed its banks, leaving four greens and six fairways under many feet of water. Dozens of members assembled in the ensuing days to squeegee silt off greens and fairways. Others brought their personal equipment to assist in the recovery. On the next Mens’ Night following the flooding, most of the usual 120+ showed up for the sole purpose of reclaiming the seventh fairway, which had accumulated over six inches of mud. Food and beverage were provided free of charge, thanks to the largesse of one of our members.

Thanks to the efforts of our Superintendent and his staff, the Pro Shop and food service staff, and the members who volunteered, we were able to reclaim all but a portion of one fairway, which has since been replaced along with the green (Number 7). This is but a small instance that demonstrates that membership in our club is not a one-way street; that we are all committed to the proposition that ours is a valuable experience in all of our lives. Simply put, “The Nesh Has Soul” • Publicus

An Ode to Number Ten

or A Twelve Step Program for Absolute Success on Hole Ten

Most golf courses have a salient feature that makes an indelible impression on those who play the course for the first time.  It can be water, trees and woods, bunkers, the size and speed of the greens, elevation changes, or any other feature or characteristic that impresses.

At the Nesh, it is likely that the most  memorable part of the round will be the playing of hole number 10, a benign par three.  In this vignette, I will suggest various ways to play the hole, then finish with the most obvious way to play the hole to maximize your golfing pleasure.

Try one of the following:

  •  Hit a nice high shot of 190 yards to the green (yes, hold the green ) and either one- or two-putt.  Score of 2 or 3.
  • Lay up with a mid iron, hit a wedge to the green, then either one- or two-putt.  Score: 3 or 4
  • Hit over the river ANYWHERE, hope to find the green with your second shot, then one- or two-putt. Score: 3 or 4.
  • Aim for the bridge, hope to hit it and get a favorable bounce in the vicinity of the green.  Then chip on, either one- or two-putt.  Score: 3 or 4
  • Aim for the SIDE of the bridge—if you can hit it, the ball will travel low, right towards the green. If on, one- or two-putt.  Score of 2 or 3.
  • Aim for the tree to the LEFT of the green.  The ball will come down somewhere on or near, enabling a score of 3 or 4.  NOTE—If you hit the tree and it careens backwards into the river, do not count that bad break…simply place the ball on the green and one- or two-putt. Score of 2 or 3.
  • Aim for the carts parked near the 8th tee— any shot hitting a cart will come back to the green.  One- or two- putts, score of 2 or 3.

Also…if any of the above result in the ball coming to rest within two club lengths of the green, you may take relief under rule “10-42-69- hike” and place the ball on green.  One or two putts will result in a score of 2 or 3.

Now, if the aforementioned are a bit beyond your talent level, here is the foolproof way to play hole 10….PLAY IT AS A PAR FIVE!!!!  The options and benefits are innumerable!!  You can:

  • Reach the green in one and putt for an albatross (and still 4-putt for par)
  • You can reach the green in two and have two putts for a birdie, three for a par.
  • Even if your tee shot finds the Neshobe River, you can still reach the green in regulation and make birdie or par.
  • You  can take four good shots to reach the putting surface, and one-putt for par.
  • Four mediocre shots will still leave a par chip or an “up and in” for no worse than bogey.

Regardless of which of the twelve methods you choose, you’ll always be rewarded with a walk up the gentle hill to the 11th tee, so you may as well enjoy your travails on 10!  Take my word for it, the best way to attack 10 is to play it as a par 5.
• Publicus

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